If an Embryo is a Person, Then Why…

The personhood of a cluster of cells is impractical. Here are the legal challenges that make this extreme position untenable.

Libby Winkler

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Photo by James Wainscoat on Unsplash

If an Embryo is a Person, Then Why… The Impracticality of Cellular Personhood

In recent debates surrounding reproductive rights, a contentious question has emerged: Should an embryo be granted the status of personhood? This extreme position, while championed by some as a defense of life, presents a labyrinth of legal, ethical, and practical challenges that cannot be overlooked.

The notion of conferring personhood upon a cluster of cells is not only scientifically unsound but also deeply problematic for women’s autonomy and rights.

The Legal Labyrinth of Embryonic Personhood

Granting personhood to embryos would necessitate a radical overhaul of existing legal frameworks.

If an embryo is a person, then logically, it would be entitled to the full spectrum of rights and protections under the law. This would include inheritance rights, the right to life, and potentially even property rights. Imagine the legal entanglements in situations of in vitro fertilization (IVF), where…

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Libby Winkler

Freelance writer who loves exploring the messiness of humanity, while poking around in nooks of life and shining light on all the things that make us complex..